Biden denies improved ties with China's adversaries is meant to contain Beijing

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Biden addresses the media following a Sunday meeting at the Communist Party of Vietnam headquarters in Hanoi with Nguyen Phu Trong, the General Secretary of the Vietnamese Communist Party.

Luong Thai Linh /POOL/AFP Getty Images


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Luong Thai Linh /POOL/AFP Getty Images


President Biden addresses the media following a Sunday meeting at the Communist Party of Vietnam headquarters in Hanoi with Nguyen Phu Trong, the General Secretary of the Communist Party of Vietnam.

Luong Thai Linh /POOL/AFP Getty Images

President Biden stated Sunday that his trips to Vietnam, India, and strengthening partnerships with Japan and Australia, among other countries were “not about containing China.” It’s all about creating a stable Asia-Pacific region. I don’t wish to contain China. “I just want to ensure that we have a good relationship with China, and everyone knows exactly what it is,” Biden said during a press conference after a bilateral meet with the leader of Vietnam’s Communist Party. “And you can do this by making sure we are all talking about the same things.

I think what we have done, and I’ve been trying to talk to my staff about it for the past six months, gives us an opportunity to reinforce alliances throughout the world. “

Biden has not met with Chinese president Xi Jinping for 10 months. He denied that the lack of high-level meetings is destabilizing Sino – U.S. relationships. He added that his staff and team still met with their Chinese counterparts but Xi had “his hands full” right now. “

He has overwhelming unemployment. “He’s trying hard to figure out why one of the main economic tenets in his plan doesn’t work.” He said that he hoped to meet Mr. Xi as soon as possible. “

The two men last met in November 2022 on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Bali.

“I want to see China succeed economically, but I want to see them succeed by the rules,” Biden said.

Earlier, following a meeting with Nguyen Phu Trong, the general secretary of Vietnam’s Communist Party, Biden said the U.S. had “strengthened our ties with another critical Indo-Pacific partner.” Biden said that the U.S. had “strengthened our ties with another critical Indo-Pacific partner” after a meeting with Nguyen Phu Trong, the general secretary of Vietnam’s Communist Party. Vietnam has accorded this status, which Washington had long desired, to four nations: China. India. Russia. And South Korea. The move is important as Washington tries to counter China’s diplomatic and militaristic heft in this region. Washington sees Vietnam as an integral nation in its regional strategies. Vietnam has reacted to China’s policies in the area, as Beijing claims water that Hanoi believes belongs to it. Biden called Trong “a critical partner at a time that I believe is very crucial” in Hanoi on Sunday. Trong, speaking through an interpreter said that the partnership between the two countries had grown “leaps-and-bounds.” Vietnam’s human rights record remains a cause for concern. Trong stressed the importance of “non interference in domestic affairs” when Biden brought up the subject.

Biden visited New Delhi for the Group of 20 Summit where he announced a new rail and ship corridor linking India, the Middle East and Europe, but not China. Biden was one of several ways that he is trying to counter the inroads China has made around the world through its Belt and Road Initiative and other development financing.